Stovetop Chocolate Chip Cookies (With a Few Indian Twists)

20150516_180822

While I’m here in Mumbai, I really miss baking. And I really miss super dark chocolate. When I came across some ideas for making cookies on the stovetop, it was too hard to resist. So what if I lack some “essential” factors like a mixer, oven, vanilla extract (substituted with vanilla essence here — it smells different but serves the same purpose!), and real, > 60% cocoa chocolate chips? Make do with what you have. A good life mantra for more than just cookies, I think.

Snapchat--24923966648646985

And so, cookies on a pan it is!

The below recipe is assuming you’re cooking in 91 degree weather (real feel 109 degrees F), sweating bullets, and you plus your cookies are melting. If this is NOT the case, you can omit all the crazy “GOTTA MAKE SURE MY COOKIES STAY NOT-MELTED” steps involving air conditioning and whatnot.

Stovetop Chocolate Chip Cookies (with a few Indian Twists)

Adapted from Baketitude

1/4 cup coconut oil, melted (which is easy in this insane summer heat)
1/4 cup cocoa
1/2 teaspoon vanilla essence

1/4 cup grated jaggery
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons ghee
1 egg (or 2-4 tablespoons dahi [yogurt])
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons atta (whole wheat flour)
Optional: handful of rolled/quick/old fashioned oats if batter is too wet
1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt, or less if your butter is salted

Combine the melted coconut oil and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla essence. Whisk in the cocoa powder. Pour into a flat container. Put in the freezer. It should harden pretty quickly. This is the beginning stage of chocolate chunks!

In the meantime, cream the jaggery, sugar, butter, and ghee. I’m not too sure about this ghee addition, it doesn’t cream very well. But it was in the original recipe and definitely adds another depth of flavor.

Add the egg and cream some more. Add the teaspoon of vanilla essence.

Now add the flour, salt, and baking powder. If the dough seems too wet add some oats.

Stow away in the fridge. Take out your chocolate chunks and with a knife, start slicing in chunks. They should crack into irregular shapes pretty easily. Get them down to a small-but-still-delicious size and then immediately stick back in the freezer. Coconut oil can melt in the blink of an eye so work quickly!

Go somewhere where there is A/C, turn it on, and let the room get cool. Bring in your dough and chocolate chunks. In front of the A/C, pour in the chocolate and combine thoroughly with the cookie dough. Quickly quickly put it in the freezer to chill.

On a nonstick skillet or dosa pan, spoon small balls, slightly flattened, of dough, about 3-5 at a time. Cover with as air-tight of a lid as you can find.

Cook over very low heat for 5-7 minutes. They might not look done on top but like most chocolate chip cookies, they taste better at this stage.

With a spatula, remove from heat and let cool.

20150516_180722

Ta da! Chocolate chip cookies!

The first time, I think my heat was too high and I also flipped the cookies – do not do this. It actually dried out the cookie. Ever have a dried out cookie (versus overbaked)? It’s edible but not ideal. Also, the coconut oil chocolate chunks will ooze out so it’s hard to tell if the bottoms are burnt or if they’re just covered in chocolate. Which, in my opinion, is not necessarily a bad thing…

1431778693500

The second batch?

20150516_180858

Utter deliciousness.

20150516_181504

Advertisements

Banana Kheer

DSCN1250

I’ve come full circle to why I started cooking in the first place, which was mainly to use up the bazillion bananas bestowed on us by my grandma who didn’t seem to accurately anticipate just how many bananas a family of four could eat in a week.

I have made so many banana breads in my life, I almost don’t even want to look at one anymore. Almost.

But, I’ve found a new, easy, delicious use for using up ripe bananas.

Enter: Kheer, a sort of pudding-like dessert flavored with jaggery/sugar, dry fruits (aka raisins, etc), nuts (usually kaju, or cashews but also badam(almonds) and pista(pistachios), and a yummy mix of spices. Yet another indian dessert that is malleable to many different versions (like halwa). Usually it’s made with rice; I replaced the rice with banana!

Banana Kheer

Adapted from what I watched my postdoc do:

3 large, overripe bananas, peeled and mashed/chopped

0.5 – 1 L milk (i’ve had success with both)

1-1.5 cubes jaggery (how sweet do you like it?)

1 tablespoon ghee (butter could work)

a handful of cashews, raisins

2 whole cardamom pods

Milk masala mix, which includes cardamom powder, mace, saffron, and nutmeg

Heat the ghee in a pan and toast the cashews/raisins, stirring quickly, until golden brown. Set aside.

Bring milk to a boil (watch that pot!!) and then add bananas; cook and continuously stir until the milk reduces a bit.

Add the jaggery and let it melt. Taste-test.

Continue to stir for a while until the milk reduces a lot and the mixture becomes super thick.

Add the spices (watch out, the milk may curdle. It’ll still taste good).

Finally, stir in the cashews and raisins, with the ghee.

 DSCN1251

Enjoy banana kheer for breakfast, dessert, snack, lunch, dinner… if you’re like me and don’t mind having dessert for dinner sometimes.

Update:

Chocolate banana kheer!

Because… how could this not happen?

And it’s so easy!

Basically, towards the end of cooking, add 2-3 heaping tablespoons of cocoa powder.

Use a fork to stir it in so you don’t get cocoa powder everywhere. This also smooths banana clumps.

Let it continue to cook until desired thickness.

Bam. Chocolate kheer.

I didn’t have any, but I’d totally top this with whipped cream.

Now where’s the peanut butter? Because I’m getting more ideas…